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COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA

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34 Pa. Code § 231.43. Regular rate.

§ 231.43. Regular rate.

 For purposes of these § §  231.41—231.43 (relating to overtime pay), the regular rate at which an employee is employed shall be deemed to include all remuneration for employment paid to or on behalf of the employee, but it shall not be deemed to include the following:

   (1)  Sums paid as gifts, payments in the nature of gifts made at Christmas time or on other special occasions as a reward for service, the amounts of which are not measured by or dependent on hours worked, production or efficiency.

   (2)  Payments made for occasional periods when no work is performed due to vacation, holiday, illness, failure of the employer to provide sufficient work or other similar cause, reasonable payments for traveling expenses or other expenses incurred by an employee in the furtherance of his employer’s interests and properly reimbursable by the employer, and other similar payments to an employee which are not made as compensation for the employee’s hours of employment.

   (3)  Sums paid in recognition of services performed during a given period if:

     (i)   Both the fact that payment is to be made and the amounts of the payment are determined at the sole discretion of the employer at or near the end of the period and not pursuant to any prior contract, agreement or promise causing the employee to expect such payments regularly.

     (ii)   The payments are made pursuant to a bona fide profit-sharing plan or trust or bona fide thrift or savings plan without regard to hours of work, production or efficiency.

     (iii)   The payments are talent fees paid to performers, including announcers on radio and television programs.

   (4)  Contributions irrevocably made by an employer to a trustee or third person under a bona fide plan for providing old-age, retirement, life, accident or health insurance or similar benefits for employees.

   (5)  Extra compensation provided by a premium rate for certain hours worked by the employee in any day or workweek because such hours are hours worked in excess of 8 in a day or in excess of the maximum workweek applicable to the employee under §  231.41 (relating to rate) or in excess of the normal working hours or regular working hours of the employee, as the case may be.

   (6)  Extra compensation provided by a premium rate paid for work by the employee on Saturdays, Sundays, holidays or regular days of rest, or on the sixth or seventh day of the workweek, where such premium rate is not less than 1 1/2 times the rate established in good faith for like work performed in nonovertime hours on other days.

   (7)  Extra compensation provided by a premium rate paid to the employee in pursuance of an applicable employment contract or collective bargaining agreement for work outside of the hours established in good faith by the contract or agreement as the basic, normal or regular workday not exceeding 8 hours or workweek not exceeding the maximum workweek applicable to the employee under §  231.41 (relating to rate), where the premium rate is not less than 1 1/2 times the rate established in good faith by the contract or agreement for like work performed during the workday or workweek.

 (b)  If the employee is paid a flat sum for a day’s work or for doing a particular job without regard to the number of hours worked in the day or at the job and if he receives no other form of compensation for services, his regular rate is determined by totaling all the sums received at the day rates or job rates in the workweek and dividing by the total hours actually worked. He is then entitled to extra half-time pay at this rate for hours worked in excess of 40 in the workweek.

 (c)  No employer may be deemed to have violated these § §  231.41—231.43 (relating to overtime pay) by employing an employee for a workweek in excess of the maximum workweek applicable to the employee under §  231.41 (relating to rate) if the employee is employed under a bona fide individual contract or under an agreement made as a result of collective bargaining by representatives of employees, if the duties of the employee necessitate substantially irregular hours of work. For example, where neither the employee nor the employer can either control or anticipate with a degree of certainty the number of hours the employee must work from week to week, where the duties of the employee necessitate significant variations in weekly hours of work both below and above the statutory weekly limit on nonovertime hours, or where the substantially irregular hours of work are not attributable to vacation periods, holidays, illness, failure of the employer to provide sufficient work, or other similar causes, and the contract or agreement:

   (1)  Specifies a regular rate of pay of not less than the minimum hourly rate and compensation at not less than 1 1/2 times the rate for hours worked in excess of the maximum workweek.

   (2)  Provides a weekly guaranty of pay for not more than 60 hours based on the rates so specified.

 (d)  No employer may be deemed to have violated these § §  231.41—231.43 by employing an employee for a workweek in excess of the maximum workweek applicable to the employee under §  231.41 if, under an agreement or understanding arrived at between the employer and the employee before performance of the work, the amount paid to the employee for the number of hours worked by him in the workweek in excess of the maximum workweek applicable to the employee under §  231.41:

   (1)  In the case of an employee employed at piece rates, is computed at piece rates not less than 1 1/2 times the bona fide piece rates applicable to the same work when performed during nonovertime hours.

   (2)  In the case of an employee’s performing two or more kinds of work for which different hourly or piece rates have been established, is computed at rates not less than 1 1/2 times the bona fide rate applicable to the same work when performed during nonovertime hours.

   (3)  Is computed at a rate not less than 1 1/2 times the rate established by the agreement or understanding as the basic rate to be used in computing overtime compensation thereunder; and if the average hourly earnings of the employee for the workweek, exclusive of payments described in subsection (a)(1)—(7), are not less than the minimum hourly rate required by applicable law and if extra overtime compensation is properly computed and paid on other forms of additional pay required to be included in computing the regular rate.

 (e)  Extra compensation paid as described in subsection (a)(5)—(7) shall be creditable toward overtime compensation payable under these § §  231.41—231.43 (relating to overtime pay).

 (f)  No employer may be deemed to have violated these § §  231.41—231.43 by employing an employee of a retail or service establishment for a workweek in excess of 40 hours if:

   (1)  The regular rate of pay of the employee is in excess of 1 1/2 times the minimum hourly rate applicable.

   (2)  More than half of the employee’s compensation for a representative period, not less than 1 month, represents commissions on goods or services. In determining the proportion of compensation representing commissions, all earnings resulting from the application of a bona fide commission rate shall be deemed commissions on goods or services without regard to whether the computed commissions exceed the draw or guarantee.

Notes of Decisions

   Daily Basis

   By its very terms, this regulation applies to those employees whose salaries are quoted on a daily basis. These plaintiffs received a salary computed on a biweekly basis, so the regulation does not apply to them. This regulation simply does not apply to all Pennsylvania employees who receive a fixed annual salary. Friedrich v. U. S. Computer Systems, Inc., # 90-1615, 3 Wage & Hour Cas. 2d (BNA) 181 (January 23, 1996).

   Flat Sum

   The placement of the disjunctives in subsection (b) of this regulation makes it applicable to two classes of employees. First, it applies to employees ‘‘paid a flat sum for a day’s work . . . without regard to the number of hours worked in the day . . .’’ Second, it applies to employees ‘‘paid a flat sum . . . for doing a particular job without regard to the number of hours worked . . . at the job.’’ Friedrich v. U. S. Computer Systems, Inc., # 90-1615, 3 Wage & Hour Cas. 2d (BNA) 181 (January 23, 1996).

   Hourly Wages

   The computer field engineers’ argument that they were hourly workers and entitled to overtime compensation failed when they were paid biweekly according to a 2-week pro rata proportion of their annual salaries and, therefore, this section was inapplicable. Friedrich v. U. S. Computer Services, Inc., 833 F.Supp. 470 (E. D. PA 1993); affirmed 187 F.3d 625 (3d Cir. Pa. 1999).

   Particular Job

   The term ‘‘particular’’ in this regulation presumably encompasses employees who perform duties as independent contractors, working on specific, discrete projects such as painting, construction or other services. Friedrich v. U. S. Computer Systems, Inc., # 90-1615, 3 Wage & Hour Cas. 2d (BNA) 181 (January 23, 1996).



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