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Pennsylvania Code



CHAPTER 17. OTHER LEGISLATIVE DOCUMENTS

Subchap. Sec.

A.    AMENDMENTS TO BILLS … 17.1
B.    RESOLUTIONS, MOTIONS AND CITATIONS … 17.41
C.    MISCELLANEOUS … 17.71

Subchapter A. AMENDMENTS TO BILLS


GENERAL

Sec.


17.1.    Constitutional requirements.
17.2.    General Bureau functions.
17.3.    Duty of draftsman.
17.4.    Marking bill for transcribing.
17.5.    Duty of typist prior to transcribing.
17.6.    Preparation of folders.
17.7.    Copies and stamping of amendments.
17.8.    Classification and filing.

STRUCTURE AND STYLE


17.21.    Structure of amendment.
17.22.    Instructional language.
17.23.    Striking language.
17.24.    Inserting language.
17.25.    Accuracy of inserted language.
17.26.    Amendments to amendatory bills.

INSERTING ADOPTED AMENDMENTS


17.31.    General procedure.
17.32.    General requirements.
17.33.    Amendments to amendatory bills.
17.34.    Subsequent amendments.
17.35.    Editorial insertions.
17.36.    Corrective reprints.

GENERAL


§ 17.1. Constitutional requirements.

 (a)  Scope of amendment. The Constitution (art. III, sec. 1) provides that no bill shall be so altered or amended, on its passage through either house, as to change its original purpose.

 (b)  Printing amendments. The Constitution (art. III, sec. 4) provides that all amendments to bills shall be printed for the use of the members before the final vote is taken on the bill.

§ 17.2. General Bureau functions.

 (a)  Bill Draftiing Section. It is the responsibility of the Bill Drafting Section to draft amendments to bills and to check them for accuracy prior to their distribution to the member or other person requesting the amendment.

 (b)  Transcribing Section. The Transcribing Section prepares all amendments and folders in proper form from the draft supplied by the Bill Drafting Section and inserts adopted amendments into bills prior to printing.

 (c)  Proofreading Section. The Proofreading Section, upon request, assists the Transcribing Section in proofreading amendments for accuracy including adopted amendments inserted into bills prior to reprinting.

 (d)  General Services Section. The General Services Section duplicates amendments for distribution and files Bureau folders containing amendments.

§ 17.3. Duty of draftsman.

 (a)  Proper print of bill. The draftsman must be sure that he is working with the last or active print of the bill. In order to do this, the cardex file of daily action on bills is checked. There are times when it is necessary to wait until the new print comes from the printer. It is very dangerous to attempt to write amendments to a print which is not the one to which the amendments will be applied.

 (b)  Other matters. The draftsman must check the title and effective date of the bill, the proofreading correction file for previous errors and, in case of amendatory bills, intervening amendments to the statute being amended.

§ 17.4. Marking bill for transcribing.

 (a)  General. In preparing amendments to bills, the draftsman takes a copy of the last or active print of the bill and indicates in pencil what changes are to be made. The language used in setting up the amendments, which go to the member requesting them, is supplied by the typist.

 (b)  Strike-outs and insertions. The draftsman must indicate strike-outs and insertions clearly so that there can be no question as to what is to be done. Language to be stricken out from the bill is indicated by running a light pencil line through it. It should not be obliterated by ink or otherwise since the typists have to quote language that is stricken out.

 (c)  Amendatory bills. In changing language of existing law in an amendatory bill, brackets are placed around any language to be eliminated and any language added is underscored. A line is not run through language of existing law.

§ 17.5. Duty of typist prior to transcribing.

 Before starting to transcribe any amendments, the typist must consult the cardex file of bills to determine whether the print of the bill before her is the last print of the bill or, if the bill has been restored to a former print, that it is the active print. This, in the first instance, is the function of the draftsman. Occasionally, however, his information is not up to the minute. If it is found that a bill to which amendments are made has been previously amended, the matter is brought to the attention of the draftsman. In transcribing amendments, a check is made with the proofreaders’ files for corrections that should be included in the amendments.

§ 17.6. Preparation of folders.

 (a)  Member. Copies of the amendments to be distributed to a member are placed in a folder on which is placed a tab containing the name of the person for whom the amendment was prepared and, if requested by someone else, ‘‘Requested by’’ followed by the name of the requester; and in the lower left hand corner, the words, ‘‘Amendments to Senate Bill No. 38,’’ or ‘‘Amendments to House Bill No. 44,’’ as the case may be.

 (b)  Bureau. In the upper left hand corner of the tab of the Bureau folder is typed in the case of Senate bills ‘‘S.B.692’’ and in the case of House bills ‘‘H.B.386.’’ Immediately following is typed the initials of the draftsman preparing the amendments followed by the initials of the typist copying them. In the upper right hand corner appear the name of the person for whom they are prepared, and the date on which they are transcribed. In place of the title of the bill, are written only the words ‘‘AMENDMENTS.’’

§ 17.7. Copies and stamping of amendments.

 The original and one copy of each amendment is placed in the Bureau file folder. Ten copies are placed in Senate folders and eleven copies are placed in House folders. Three copies in the member’s folder contain the stamp of the Bureau.

§ 17.8. Classification and filing.

 No classification numbers are used for amendments to bills. They are filed in the order of the bill number of the Senate or House bill which is amended.

STRUCTURE AND STYLE


§ 17.21. Structure of amendment.

 (a)  General. Amendments are usually prepared in conventional typewritten form on plain white paper which does not contain line numbers.

 (b)  Heading. All amendments begin with the words ‘‘AMENDMENTS TO SENATE (or HOUSE) BILL NO. 3’’ which is entirely in capital letters and centered at the top of the page. In all cases, the abbreviation ‘‘Mr.,’’ centered to the left so that a name may be inserted follows next and the printer’s number is noted on the next line below and brought out to the right hand margin. The initials of the draftsman and typist and date are placed at the top left hand corner.

 (c)  Paragraphing. Each separate amendment to the bill is set out in a separate unnumbered paragraph.

§ 17.22. Instructional language.

 (a)  General. All amendments are made by reference to the title or section of the bill to be amended, and the page or pages and line or lines where the change to be made appears.

 (b)  Reference to words. Amendments usually contain a reference to words. If a word to be quoted appears two or three times in the line, it is necessary to add after quoting the word ‘‘where it appears for the first (or second, or third) time.’’

 (c)  Form. All amendments begin with the word ‘‘Amend’’ and a reference to the place on the bill to be amended, as for example ‘‘Amend Title, page 1, line 1,’’ or ‘‘Amend Sec. 1, page 5, lines 1 to 28.’’

§ 17.23. Striking language.

 (a)  Quoting words or figures. Except in the language of existing law in an amendatory bill, if words and figures are to be omitted, the form is ‘‘by striking out’’ quoting the exact words and figures to be omitted.

 (b)  Striking entire lines and pages. If an entire line or lines are to be stricken out, all the line or lines to be stricken out are not quoted. The form is ‘‘by striking out all of said line’’ or ‘‘by striking out all of said lines.’’ If the strike-out starts in the middle of a line, the form will be ‘‘by striking out (quoting the words appearing in the part of the line to be stricken out) in line 9, and all of lines 10 through 15;’’ or if the strike-out includes part of one line, all of the next three lines, and a part of the fourth line, the form will be ‘‘by striking out (quoting the words in the first line to be stricken out) in line 9, all of lines 10, 11 and 12 and (quoting the words to be stricken out in the fourth line) in line 13.’’ If a section to be stricken out appears on two or more pages, the strike-out should be made all in one amendment in the form ‘‘Amend Sec. 4, page 3, lines 8 through 20, page 4, lines 1 through 20, page 5, lines 1 and 2, by striking out all of said lines.’’

§ 17.24. Inserting language.

 (a)  General. If words or figures are to be inserted, the language will be ‘‘by inserting after’’ (writing the word or figure after which the insert is made within quotation marks), followed by the language to be inserted not quoted but set out in the next line and written in single space and indented. The purpose of this is so that the language to be inserted may be cut out of the typewritten amendments and pasted on the printed bill for insertion after adoption of the amendment. Indentation of language to be inserted should not be exaggerated. If it consists of more than a line or two, the indentation will be ten spaces only on each side.

 (b)  Adding new units. If an entirely new section is to be inserted in a bill, it is done in the following form: ‘‘Amend bill, page 4, by inserting between lines 6 and 7,’’ (setting forth the language of the section to be inserted). If a new subsection or other minor subdivision is to be inserted in a section, the language will be ‘‘Amend Sec. 2, page 3, by inserting between lines 8 and 9,’’ (setting forth the subsection or minor subdivision to be inserted).

 (c)  Simultaneous strike-out and insert. If some language is to be omitted and other language substituted at the same place, the general rules apply, except that the language will be ‘‘by striking out (quoting the language to be stricken out), and inserting.’’

§ 17.25. Accuracy of inserted language.

 (a)  General. Inserts as typed are cut out and pasted on the bill for insertion prior to reprinting. For this reason they must not contain a word or mark other than those intended to become a part of the statute if the bill is adopted and approved.

 (b)  Punctuation and capitalization. No quotation marks or underscoring are included unless the quotation marks or underscoring are properly a part of the new statute. While inserts on the printed bill appear in capital letters, they are typed as they would be in a bill with punctuation and are capitalized only where necessary.

§ 17.26. Amendments to amendatory bills.

 (a)  General. A number of special rules are observed in amending amendatory bills, since the system of amending existing statutes must continue to be carried out.

 (b)  Reference to section of existing statute. In amending bills that seek to amend an existing statute, it is necessary in addition to referring to the section of the bill, to refer to the section of the statute that is being amended. This saves a great deal of confusion as to what section is being referred to. The section of the existing statute immediately follows the section number of the bill and is placed within parentheses in the form ‘‘Amend Sec. 1 (Sec. 402).’’

INSERTING ADOPTED AMENDMENTS


§ 17.31. General procedure.

 If amendments are adopted, they are pasted at their proper location on the bill amended. The bill, together with the inserts, is transmitted to the Transcribing Section of the Bureau which makes the changes in the computer to the current print of the bill which is then reprinted with a new printer’s number.

§ 17.32. General requirements.

 (a)  Inserting language. In inserting amendments to bills, all language inserted is in CAPITAL LETTERS.

 (b)  Striking language. In inserting amendments to bills, all language deleted appears in strike-out-type.

§ 17.33. Amendments to amendatory bills.

 (a)  Inserting language. In inserting amendments to amendatory bills, all language inserted is in CAPITAL LETTERS and as much of the language inserted that is an addition to existing law is underscored.

 (b)  Striking language. In inserting amendments to amendatory bills, all language inserted is in CAPITAL LETTERS and as much of the language inserted that is a deletion from existing law is placed within brackets ‘‘[...]’’. In case of deletion of language from existing law that already appears in the bill, brackets are merely inserted around the language to be deleted.

§ 17.34. Subsequent amendments.

 (a)  General. If the bill is again amended in the house of origin, everything appearing in strike-out-type in the former print is omitted from the new print, and the capital letters are reset in lower case. The same rule prevails in the case of the first amendment made by the house of reference.

 (b)  House of reference. If the house of reference amends the bill more than once, its former amendments are not eliminated from the print, because the house of origin must have before it all amendments made by the house of reference in order to decide whether or not it will concur in the changes.

§ 17.35. Editorial insertions.

 (a)  Amendments in house of reference. In case of an amendment to a bill by the house of reference, the phrase ‘‘HOUSE AMENDED’’ or ‘‘SENATE AMENDED’’ is placed in capital letters at the top of the first page of the bill.

 (b)  Printer’s numbers. The prior printer’s number is added at the left side of the top of the first page of the bill and the new printer’s number is added at the right side.

 (c)  Sponsors. In case of a change of a sponsor contained on a prior print of the bill, the name of the sponsor is either added or deleted, as the case may be.

 (d)  Time of amendment. Preceding the title of the bill, the fact and date of amendment is indicated in capital letters in the following form:

   ‘‘AS AMENDED ON THIRD CONSIDERATION, HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, FEBRUARY 20, 1974.’’

 (e)  Identification of amendments.The location of the amendments are identified by an arrow () inserted on each page of the bill beginning with the first line where the amendment begins.

§ 17.36. Corrective reprints.

 Occasionally, bills reprinted for the purpose of incorporating amendments adopted by either house or a committee contain errors which merit correction before consideration by the house having possession of the bill. In such case, the bill is reprinted without formal amendment with the caption at the top of the first page of the bill ‘‘HOUSE AMENDED’’ or ‘‘SENATE AMENDED’’ immediately followed on a separate line by ‘‘CORRECTIVE REPRINT.’’

Subchapter B. RESOLUTIONS, MOTIONS AND CITATIONS


GENERAL

Sec.


17.41.    Use generally.
17.42.    Single house resolutions.
17.43.    Concurrent resolutions.
17.44.    Motions and citations.
17.45.    Form generally.
17.46.    Date line.
17.47.    Preamble.
17.48.    Body.
17.49.    Number and distribution of copies.
17.50.    Amendments.

JOINT RESOLUTIONS


17.61.    Use.
17.62.    Form.
17.63.    Title.
17.64.    Resolving clause.
17.65.    Body.
17.66.    Schedules.

GENERAL


§ 17.41. Use generally.

 Resolutions, motions and citations are used for separate actions of each house and concurrent resolutions are used for joint action of both houses where bills and joint resolutions are not appropriate. The procedure for preparing and introducing resolutions (except joint resolutions), motions and citations is generally the same. Accordingly, a reference contained in § §  17.42 to 17.50 (relating to resolutions, motions and citations) shall also be deemed a reference to a motion and citation unless the context clearly indicates otherwise.

§ 17.42. Single house resolutions.

 Common uses of Senate or House resolutions are for adopting rules, fixing the last day for introduction of bills, discharging a standing committee or conference committee from consideration of a bill, establishing a select or special committee to study or investigate a particular subject or matter or to arrange memorial services for deceased members, and extending congratulations or condolences.

§ 17.43. Concurrent resolutions.

 Common uses of concurrent resolutions are for recalling a bill from the Governor or the other house, returning a bill to the Governor, adjournments sine die or in excess of three days, recesses in excess of a week and memorializing Congress.

§ 17.44. Motions and citations.

 (a)  Motions. A motion may be oral or written. Motions may be used to adjourn or recess (except where a concurrent resolution is required), concur or nonconcur in amendments by house of reference, recede from amendments nonconcurred in by other house, insist on amendments nonconcurred in by other house, call for the previous question, raise a question of order or privilege, reconsider a vote or question, postpone action, commit or recommit to a committee, lay on or take from the table, amend a motion, limit or extend debate and to bring other matters before the house not otherwise provided for.

 (b)  Citations. A legislative citation is a written document used only by the House for the purpose of extending congratulations to a particular person or for a special occasion. In the Senate, a resolution is used to accomplish the same purpose.

§ 17.45. Form generally.

 (a)  General. The form of Senate, House and concurrent resolutions is substantially the same except that resolutions to be presented in the Senate, whether a Senate resolution or a concurrent resolution, carry the Senate date line and any distinctive language contained in the resolution which indicates the fact that it originates in the Senate. Likewise, resolutions presented in the House are similarly identified.

 (b)  Titles. Resolutions, motions and citations do not contain titles expressing the subject of the contents as in the case of bills and joint resolutions.

§ 17.46. Date line.

 A Senate resolution or a concurrent resolution to be introduced in the Senate commences with the date line ‘‘In the Senate.’’ The date is left blank, to be filled in by the sponsor when he decides to use the resolution. If the resolution is a House resolution or a concurrent resolution to be used in the House, the date line will read ‘‘In the House of Representatives.’’

§ 17.47. Preamble.

 (a)  General. Some resolutions and citations begin with a preamble which is usually divided into several paragraphs, each of which may, but does not necessarily begin with the word ‘‘WHEREAS,’’ which, when used, is always written in capital letters. Each paragraph of the preamble concludes with a semicolon immediately followed by the word ‘‘and.’’ The last paragraph of the preamble concludes with a semicolon, even though it is the end of a complete sentence, and is immediately followed by the words, ‘‘therefore be it’’ with no punctuation.

 (b)  Citations. Citations and congratulatory or condolence resolutions vary from the form of other resolutions in that the preamble usually contains one ‘‘WHEREAS’’ at the beginning and the last paragraph concludes with a period.

§ 17.48. Body.

 (a)  General. The resolution itself may be in one or more paragraphs. Each paragraph begins with the word ‘‘RESOLVED,’’ which is always written in capital letters. If it is a concurrent resolution to be introduced in the Senate, the word ‘‘RESOLVED,’’ is immediately followed by ‘‘(the House of Representatives concurring),’’. In both cases, this is immediately followed by the word ‘‘That’’. In the case of a Senate resolution or a House resolution, the words in parentheses are omitted and the word ‘‘That’’ immediately follows the word ‘‘RESOLVED,’’. If there is more than one paragraph in the resolution, each paragraph, other than the last, ends with a semicolon, even though it may be at the end of a complete sentence, and the semicolon is followed by the words, ‘‘and be it further’’ without any punctuation. The following paragraph commences with the words ‘‘RESOLVED, That.’’

 (b)  Citations. Citations and congratulatory or condolence resolutions vary from the form of other resolutions in that the body usually consists of one paragraph beginning with ‘‘Now therefore, the Senate (or House of Representatives)’’ and ends with ‘‘and further directs that a copy of this citation be transmitted to’’ or ‘‘and further directs that a copy of this resolution, sponsored by Senator


, be transmitted to’’.

 (c)  Motions. A motion is usually in a form similar to the following:

 ‘‘Moved by the gentleman from


, Mr.
and seconded by the gentleman from
Mr.
that the vote by which House Bill No.
, Printer’s No.
entitled ‘
’ was defeated on final passage on Tuesday, May 12, 1955, be reconsidered.’’

§ 17.49. Number and distribution of copies.

 Eight copies are made of each resolution. None of the copies are backed. The eight copies are placed in a folder addressed to the member or other person for whom the resolution was drawn. The original and one carbon copy are placed in a folder for the Bureau files.

§ 17.50. Amendments.

 Some resolutions are printed in bill form. They are amended in the same way as bills. When a resolution is not printed amendments are made to the typewritten copy as introduced or to the resolution as printed in the history.

JOINT RESOLUTIONS


§ 17.61. Use.

 A joint resolution is used for the purpose of proposing amendments to the Constitution of Pennsylvania or ratifying proposed amendments to the Constitution of the United States.

§ 17.62. Form.

 While a joint resolution is not a bill in the usual sense, it is prepared in the form of a bill and amended in the same manner.

§ 17.63. Title.

 (a)  General. Joint resolutions do not require new matter in the title since the constitutional requirements relating to bills are not applicable. However, it is very helpful to have a title containing new matter which can usually be stated in a very few words.

 (b)  Form. The title of a joint resolution may be in substantially the following form:

‘‘A JOINT RESOLUTION

 Proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, reducing the number of senatorial and representative districts.’’

§ 17.64. Resolving clause.

 Each joint resolution contains a resolving clause in the following form:

   ‘‘The General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania hereby resolves as follows:’’

§ 17.65. Body.

 (a)  General. Each joint resolution includes a section or sections containing instructions in substantially the following form followed by the provision added or amended containing brackets to show deletions and underscoring to show additions:

 ‘‘Section 1. The following amendment to the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania is proposed in accordance with the provisions of the eleventh article thereof:

 ‘‘That section sixteen, article two of the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania be amended to read:’’

 (b)  Submission to electorate. The last section of the joint resolution usually contains a provision relating to the submission of the proposed amendment to the electorate in substantially the following form:

 ‘‘Section 2. This proposed amendment shall be submitted by the Secretary of the Commonwealth to the qualified electors of this Commonwealth, at the primary election next held after the advertising requirements of article eleven, section one of the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania have been satisfied.’’

§ 17.66. Schedules.

 Occasionally, the provision amended is followed by a schedule containing temporary provisions such as the time the amendment is to be effective. The schedule, which is not officially a part of the Constitution, may be in substantially the following form:

‘‘SCHEDULE

 The foregoing amendment to article two of the Constitution of Pennsylvania shall become effective the year following that in which the next Federal decennial census is officially reported as required by Federal law.’’

Subchapter C. MISCELLANEOUS


BILL ANALYSES

Sec.


17.71.    Use and scope.
17.72.    Contents.
17.73.    Heading.
17.74.    Time of preparation.
17.75.    Printing and distribution.

CONFERENCE REPORTS


17.81.    Form generally.
17.82.    Print used for preparation.
17.83.    Preparation of bill.
17.84.    Preparation of report.
17.85.    Envelope and folder.
17.86.    Distribution and filing.
17.87.    Printing.

REORGANIZATION AND ASSISTANCE PLANS


17.91.    Use.
17.92.    Form generally.
17.93.    Heading.
17.94.    Suspension of statutes.
17.95.    Resolutions.
17.96.    Folders.
17.97.    Distribution and filing.
17.98.    Printing.

BILL ANALYSES


§ 17.71. Use and scope.

 (a)  General. Bill analyses are summaries prepared by the Bureau describing the contents of certain bills and joint resolutions. The purpose of the analysis is to provide an objective expert legal analysis of the contents of the bill and is only the analyser’s opinion of what the bill does. The word opinion used in this context refers only to the legal aspects of a bill and not to its merits. The opinion of the analyser on the merits of a bill has no place in an analysis, and he must exercise great care that his opinion is not discernible through a reading of his work. In other words, he must be completely impartial to all but the technical aspects of each bill he analyzes.

 (b)  Amendments. As the bill is amended on its course through both houses, subsequent analyses are made, but these are limited to the effect of the amendments, with reference made to prior analyses.

§ 17.72. Contents.

 The form which the analysis will take is usually determined by the nature and arrangement of the bill under consideration. Hard and fast rules for the arrangement of an analysis are impractical, but in most cases the analysis will include:

   (1)  A statement of the primary purpose of the bill.

   (2)  Any question as to the constitutionality of the bill.

   (3)  If an amendment to existing law, a brief explanation of other provisions of the same statute, if any, which will be affected, or an understanding of which are necessary to comprehend the full import of the bill.

   (4)  A summary of the specific provisions through which the purpose of the bill will be achieved.

   (5)  A statement of the effect, if any, upon existing law.

§ 17.73. Heading.

 A bill analysis contains a heading at the right side of the top of the first page containing the bill number, printer’s number and date of the legislative day for which prepared.

§ 17.74. Time of preparation.

 Bills in possession of the Senate are analyzed once a week in time for distribution at the beginning of the next week of session. Bills in possession of the House are analyzed daily in time for distribution at the beginning on the next legislative day.

§ 17.75. Printing and distribution.

 The original typewritten copy of each analysis is transmitted to the House duplicating room which duplicates 300 copies and transmits them to the Legislative Printing Clerk for final preparation and distribution as follows:

   (1)  The original and 25 copies are transmitted to the Bureau which retains the original and distributes one copy to each of the following:

     (i)   Governor and Lieutenant Governor.

     (ii)   Bureau library and reception room.

     (iii)   Legislative Budget and Finance Committee.

     (iv)   Senate and House leaders.

     (v)   Court Administrator of Pennsylvania.

     (vi)   Pennsylvania Bar Association.

   (2)  The remaining copies are transmitted to each member of the General Assembly.

CONFERENCE REPORTS


§ 17.81. Form generally.

 Conference reports are in the form of a bill preceded by a report of a conference committee proposing a revision of the bill for consideration by the General Assembly. Reports are prepared in quadruplicate by the Bureau by indicating the changes on the appropriate print of the bill under consideration.

§ 17.82. Print used for preparation.

 Conference reports are usually prepared by indicating changes to be made on four copies of the last print of the bill. This, however, is not an unbending rule as in the case of amendments to bills. It may sometimes be more convenient to use another print especially where the conference committee decides not to use the amendments last made. If a prior report was made, that print should be used for preparing the report.

§ 17.83. Preparation of bill.

 (a)  General. In preparing the proper print of the bill everything to be omitted must be effectively lined out and inserts must be clearly indicated and legible.

 (b)  Mechanics of preparation. A line is drawn by blue pencil through everything appearing on the bill above the title, except the words ‘‘Printer’s No,’’ and also all language which is to be omitted from the conference committee report. Any language that is to be inserted in the report is typewritten on small tabs of paper which are pasted on the margin of the printed bill, interlined in blue pencil at the proper point; the purpose being that when the report is printed, it will appear as a new bill with no indications of prior amendments. All amendments appearing in capital letters are marked ‘‘L C’’ except initial letters that should remain capitalized. These letters are doubly underscored to indicate that they remain in capital letters.

 (c)  Precautions for amendatory bills. If the subject of the conference report is an amendatory bill, the same precautions must be taken as in writing a new amendatory bill. It must be checked for over-looked prior amendments. The text of the statute cited for amendment must be compared with the Laws of Pennsylvania. The use of brackets and underscoring must be carefully verified especially in language introduced in the bill by amendment.

§ 17.84. Preparation of report.

 (a)  General. The report of the conference committee consists of a completed printed form of a report which is folded around the prepared print of the bill. A blue form is used for House bills and a yellow or white form is used for Senate bills. The printed form contains lines for signatures of the members of the conference committee which are left blank.

 (b)  Printer’s and bill numbers. In the upper left hand corner of the form appear the words ‘‘Previous Printer’s Nos.’’ After this is typed all of the printer’s numbers, including the latest print, that have been assigned to the bill each time it has been printed. On the same line and to the right is typed ‘‘Printer’s No.’’ but with no number inserted. This is left blank. It is for the new printer’s number that will be assigned it for the new print. Just below in spaces left for the purpose is typed ‘‘Senate’’ or ‘‘House’’ and the bill number.

 (c)  Title of bill. In the space following ‘‘entitled,’’ is copied in quotation marks the title of the bill as it appears on the last (or active) print, or as much of the title as the space provided will permit. Even when the conference report changes the title of the bill, the title as it appears on the last printed (or active) copy of the bill is used. The bill was referred to the committee by this title, and its report must conform to the commitment. The changed title appears only on the bill recommended by the committee.

§ 17.85. Envelope and folder.

 (a)  Envelope for committee. Conference committee reports are not folded. They are placed flat in a large manila envelope, on which is written only the name of the member of the conference committee requesting the report and the words, ‘‘Conference Report on Senate (or House) Bill No. 310.’’

 (b)  Bureau folder. In the upper left hand corner of the tab on the folder, in place of the classification number, is written in the case of Senate bills ‘‘S.B.692’’ and in the case of House bills ‘‘H.B. 386.’’ Immediately following is written the initials of the draftsman preparing the report, followed by the initials of the typist copying them. In the upper right hand corner appear the name of the person for whom they are written, and the date on which they are written. In place of the title of the bill, are written only the words ‘‘CONFERENCE REPORT.’’

§ 17.86. Distribution and filing.

 No classification numbers are used for conference reports. They are filed in the order of the number of the Senate or House bill which is reported. Three copies of the completed report are sent to the committee. The fourth is for the Bureau files.

§ 17.87. Printing.

 Reports of conference committees are printed together with the bill in the form agreed to by the committee. In printing the report, the bill is printed as though it had just been introduced without indicating any changes.

REORGANIZATION AND ASSISTANCE PLANS


§ 17.91. Use.

 (a)  General. Reorganization plans are used for the reorganization of Commonwealth agencies and are submitted by the Governor to the General Assembly for its consideration and appropriate action including the adoption of a resolution by each house either approving or disapproving the plan. Reorganization plans are prepared for the Governor’s office which transmits the plan, identified by a plan number, to both houses.

 (b)  Supplemental assistance plans. Supplemental assistance plans, authorized under section 432 (2.1) of the Public Welfare Code (62 P. S. §  432 (2.1)) to provide payments to aged, blind and disabled persons, are prepared in the same manner and follow the same legislative procedure as reorganization plans. The plan is designated ‘‘SUPPLEMENTAL ASSISTANCE PLAN NO. 1 OF 1974’’ and identified as ‘‘S.A.P. NO. 1.’’

§ 17.92. Form generally.

 The reorganization plan is prepared generally in the form of a bill and is accompanied by appropriate resolutions to approve or disapprove the plan.

§ 17.93. Heading.

 The reorganization plan does not contain a title setting forth the subject matter of the plan but contains a heading identifying the plan number and year as follows:

‘‘REORGANIZATION PLAN NO. 2 of 1973’’

§ 17.94. Suspension of statutes.

 The reorganization plan usually contains one or more sections suspending all or part of a statute or statutes that are in conflict with the plan as follows:

   ‘‘Articles 9 and 10, act of June 13, 1967 (P. L. 31, No. 21), known as the Public Welfare Code, are suspended in so far as they conflict with this Reorganization Plan.’’

§ 17.95. Resolutions.

 (a)  Approval of plan. The reorganization plan is accompanied by a resolution approving the plan in the following form:

 ‘‘Resolved, That Reorganization Plan No. 2 of 1973, transmitted to the General Assembly under date of


, 1973, which is incorporated herein by reference, be approved.’’

 (b)  Disapproval of plan. The reorganization plan is also accompanied by a resolution disapproving the plan in the following form:

 ‘‘Resolved, That Reorganization Plan No. 2 of 1973, transmitted to the General Assembly under date of


1973, which is incorporated herein by reference, be disapproved.’’

§ 17.96. Folders.

 (a)  Distribution. The tab on the folder for the Governor’s office contains the name of the person requesting the plan and designation of the Governor’s office. On the left side of the bottom of the tab is inserted ‘‘REORGANIZATION PLAN NO. 2 of 1973.’’

 (b)  Bureau. On the first line of the tab for the Bureau folder is typed ‘‘REORGANIZATION PLAN NO. 2 of 1973.’’ On the second line to the left is inserted the classification number, the draftsman’s name and the typist’s initials. To the right is typed the name of the person requesting the plan and the date. On the following line is typed a brief description of the plan.

§ 17.97. Distribution and filing.

 Reorganization plans are filed according to classification number. Eight copies are placed in the distribution folder and the orginal is placed in the Bureau’s folder.

§ 17.98. Printing.

 The reorganization plan is printed in the general form of a bill and is identified by R.P. 1, R.P. 2, etc. The resolutions are printed on the calendar of each house as resolution A (approved) and B (disapproved).



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